MA Research Project
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A statement about Scheele's Green by Dr Thudichum gives us an insight into why, despite the dangers (and even despite its inventor's warning), the arsenic paint had continued to be used for over a hundred years. He said, "my eyes rejoiced at the beautiful bright arsenic paper and when I looked at the abominable greys, hideous browns and dreadful yellows made without arsenic, I can not help thinking that this would be the paper I should like to have in my room." This love of Green, so tastelessly expressed by Dr Thudichum is one shared by many artists - as in many ways Green is the most "natural" colour in the world. After all, most of the natural world is Green. Yet for artists, it has long been a difficult colour to reproduce. Likewise, this most "organic" of colours (the colour of grass, trees and fields)  has often been made traditionally from metal or to be more accurate the corrosion of metal. 
 
As my output, I designed an infographic that takes a closer look to compare the usage and the toxicity levels of the Green pigment (a finely ground material that imparts colour to paint, cosmetics, printing inks, textiles, plastics etc) over a period of time. Thus highlighting the ironic realities about the Green pigment. 
 
More importantly through my outcome, I wanted to spark a more critical discussion about the use of the colour Green in print design and production. Does "Green" deserve this position of pride on all things sustainable and eco-friendly?
Experimenting with homemade dyes from natural ingredients
The Final Outcome

An infographic that takes a closer look to compare the usage and the toxicity levels of the Green pigment over a period of time. Thus highlighting the ironic realities about the Green pigment.
 
The book was intentionally printed using as little ink as possible and just one pigment, the black pigment. As I had discovered that black is the most sustainable ink for printing.
 
Does "Green" deserve this position of pride on all things sustainable and eco-friendly?

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